The History Of Words Sunday

I thought this word would have an older origin. I wonder if the word has carried the controversy it has today during it’s whole of existence? Believe in them or don’t, but there’s no doubt this word has earned a place in our daily lexicon.

angel (n.)

“one of a class of spiritual beings, attendants and messengers of God,” a c. 1300 fusion of Old English engel(with hard -g-) and Old French angele.

Both are from Late Latin angelus, from Greek angelos, literally “messenger, envoy, one that announces,” in the New Testament “divine messenger,” which is possibly related to angaros “mounted courier,” both from an unknown Oriental word (Watkins compares Sanskrit ajira-“swift;” Klein suggests Semitic sources).

Used in Scriptural translations for Hebrew mal’akh (yehowah) “messenger (of Jehovah),” from base l-‘-k “to send.” An Old English word for it was aerendgast, literally “errand-spirit.”

Of persons, “one who is loving, gracious, or lovely,” by 1590s. The medieval English gold coin (a new issue of the noble, first struck 1465 by Edward VI) was so called for the image of archangel Michael slaying the dragon, which was stamped on it. It was the coin given to patients who had been “touched” for the King’s Evil. Angel food cake is from 1881; angel dust“phencyclidine” is from 1968.

About G.Edward Smith

A stranger in a strange land...
This entry was posted in The History Of Words Sunday and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to The History Of Words Sunday

  1. Great is this article, even the question itself, the mere thinking of where the “angel” has descended from !!!!! 👼👼👼 📖

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.