The History Of Words Sunday

                I always heard ‘never trust a left-handed person,’ but I didn’t realize that the word sinister was derived from doing things with the left hand. That almost seems crazy in a way. It just goes to show that the history of words is a fascinating subject and we all should learn what we can about these little words we throw around everyday in our writing and speech.

thABZM8VSQ

sinister

adjective

sin·​is·​ter | \ ˈsi-nə-stər , archaic sə-ˈni-\

Definition of sinister

1 archaic : unfavorable, unlucky

2 archaic : fraudulent

3 : singularly evil or productive of evil

4a : of, relating to, or situated to the left or on the left side of something especially : being or relating to the side of a heraldic shield at the left of the person bearing it

b : of ill omen by reason of being on the left

5 : presaging ill fortune or trouble

6 : accompanied by or leading to disaster

etymology-sinister-23561p_l

sinister (adj.)

early 15c., “prompted by malice or ill-will, intending to mislead,” from Old French senestre, sinistre “contrary, false; unfavorable; to the left” (14c.), from Latin sinister “left, on the left side” (opposite of dexter), of uncertain origin. Perhaps meaning properly “the slower or weaker hand” [Tucker], but Klein and Buck suggest it’s a euphemism (see left (adj.)) connected with the root of Sanskrit saniyan “more useful, more advantageous.” With contrastive or comparative suffix -ter, as in dexter (see dexterity).

The Latin word was used in augury in the sense of “unlucky, unfavorable” (omens, especially bird flights, seen on the left hand were regarded as portending misfortune), and thus sinister acquired a sense of “harmful, unfavorable, adverse.” This was from Greek influence, reflecting the early Greek practice of facing north when observing omens. In genuine Roman auspices, the augurs faced south and left was favorable. Thus sinister also retained a secondary sense in Latin of “favorable, auspicious, fortunate, lucky.”

Meaning “evil” is from late 15c. Used in heraldry from 1560s to indicate “left, to the left.” Bend (not “bar”) sinister in heraldry indicates illegitimacy and preserves the literal sense of “on or from the left side” (though in heraldry this is from the view of the bearer of the shield, not the observer of it; see bend (n.2)).

 

About G.Edward Smith

A stranger in a strange land...
This entry was posted in The History Of Words Sunday and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.