The History of Words Sunday

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I have always considered this one of the strangest words out there. So peculiar in its spelling and for what it means. This is one of those words I wish I would have created out of thin air to describe such a wonderful thing.

saga(n.)

1709, an antiquarians’ revival to describe the medieval prose narratives of Iceland and Norway, from Old Norse saga “saga, story,” cognate with Old English sagu “a saying” (see saw (n.2)). Properly, a narrative composition of Iceland or Norway in the Middle Ages, or one that has their characteristics. Meaning “long, convoluted story” is from 1857.
saga
When your friend tells you every detail of how she tripped over a rock, broke her ankle, and then got into a car accident on the way to the hospital, she is sharing a long, involved story known as a saga.
The word saga has its origins in the Middle Ages. In those days, a saga was an historical tale of the first families who lived in Norway or Iceland. Today the word is used to describe a very complicated or detailed series of events. A saga is the kind of long, drawn-out story that can cause the people who hear it to roll their eyes in boredom.

Definitions of: saga

a narrative telling the adventures of a hero or a family; originally (12th to 14th centuries) a story of the families that settled Iceland and their descendants but now any prose narrative that resembles such an account

About G.Edward Smith

A stranger in a strange land...
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1 Response to The History of Words Sunday

  1. Literary Remains says:

    I’ve read the Icelandic Sagas… very fascinating and kind of required reading for us Vikings! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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